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ONCE-MONTHLY VIVITROL ALONG WITH COUNSELING MAY GIVE YOU A PATH FORWARD IN YOUR alcohol dependence RECOVERY JOURNEY1

Continually facing the consequences of alcohol dependence can be a challenge, but you are not alone.

VIVITROL and counseling may be able to help with your alcohol dependence.

VIVITROL and counseling has been proven to reduce the number of heavy drinking days* in patients with alcohol dependence1,2

In a study of 624 patients with alcohol dependence, those who received VIVITROL and counseling had 25% fewer heavy drinking days* per month compared to those who received placebo (injection without medication) and counseling. Patients were studied for 6 months in an outpatient setting.

*Heavy drinking days were defined as 5 or more drinks per day for men and 4 or more drinks per day for women.

A small group of patients in the same 6-month study did not drink alcohol for one week before the study began. Within this group, the patients who received VIVITROL were more likely to not drink any alcohol during the study compared with patients who received placebo1,2

There were 53 patients who had stopped drinking alcohol completely one week prior to their first injection. Among this group, 41% of patients who received VIVITROL did not drink any alcohol throughout the study compared to 17% of those who received placebo.

The same result was not seen in patients who were still drinking at the start of the study.

Common side effects of VIVITROL in clinical studies included nausea, sleepiness, headache, dizziness, vomiting, decreased appetite, painful joints, muscle cramps, cold symptoms, trouble sleeping, toothache.

VIVITROL is a once-monthly injection1

Your recovery journey is worth fighting for.

ASK YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IF
ONCE-MONTHLY VIVITROL MAY BE RIGHT FOR YOU.


SETTING TREATMENT GOALS FOR YOUR RECOVERY JOURNEY

On the road to recovery, there may be challenges along the way. Revisiting treatment goals with your doctor may help you stay motivated in your recovery.3

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NEED HELP PREPARING FOR TREATMENT?

These tips may help you prepare for your VIVITROL injection.

Learn more

VIVITROL is not right for everyone. There are significant risks from VIVITROL treatment, including risk of opioid overdose, severe reaction at the injection site, sudden opioid withdrawal, liver damage, or hepatitis.

Talk to your healthcare provider about naloxone, a medicine that is available to patients for the emergency treatment of an opioid overdose.

Call 911 or get emergency medical help right away in all cases of known or suspected opioid overdose, even if naloxone is administered.

If you are being treated for alcohol dependence but also use or are addicted to opioid-containing medicines or opioid street drugs, it is important that you tell your healthcare provider before starting VIVITROL to avoid having sudden opioid withdrawal symptoms when you start VIVITROL treatment.

See Important Safety Information.

See Prescribing Information and Medication Guide.


References: 1. VIVITROL [prescribing information]. Waltham, MA: Alkermes, Inc; rev March 2021. 2. Garbutt JC, Kranzler HR, O’Malley SS, et al. Efficacy and tolerability of long-acting injectable naltrexone for alcohol dependence: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2005;293(13):1617-1625. 3. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Enhancing motivation for change in substance use disorder treatment. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 35. SAMHSA Publication No. EP19-02-01-003. Printed 2019.

References: 1. VIVITROL [prescribing information]. Waltham, MA: Alkermes, Inc; rev March 2021. 2. Garbutt JC, Kranzler HR, O’Malley SS, et al. Efficacy and tolerability of long-acting injectable naltrexone for alcohol dependence: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2005;293(13):1617-1625. 3. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Enhancing motivation for change in substance use disorder treatment. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 35. SAMHSA Publication No. EP19-02-01-003. Printed 2019.